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        Busy, Busy, Busy! This is the life of a mom: packed with both profound joy and plenty of things to do. Trying new things is always fun–if you’ve got the time and energy for them, of course 🙂 . Even as I write this blog, my goofy 1 yr old is crawling all over my lap trying to get my attention (and the keyboard!). Juggling my many duties has certainly been a learning process, and, naturally, I’ve had many failures along the way. One of those failures was my attempt to make chicken bone broth a few months ago, which I ruined twice in a row…oofda. Burnt bone broth + a small apartment = a stinky combination. It’s true that one learns best by making mistakes, but also by reading as much as possible to prevent potential problems. Hence, why I’ve loaded this article with further reading.

        After my failures, successes, and reading, I’ve compiled some useful tips on making successful bone broth:

        1. If your bones are raw, make sure you roast them before you make broth with them! http://www.foodabovegold.com/how-to-roast-bones/

        2. Bring the broth to a boil and gently simmer it; do NOT keep it at a rolling boil. More details can be found here: http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/video-the-perfect-simmer-on-your-stock/

        3. If you’re concerned about your broth cooking while you’re out of the house, it’s more than okay to use the cumulative time method of cooking: http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/the-cumulative-time-approach-for-making-stock/

        4. You can reuse bones from previous bone broth. This french method is called remouillage, and it stretches both your dollar and broth flavor: http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/remouillage-getting-the-most-out-of-your-broth-bones/

        5. If it’s easier for you, you can make bone broth in an instant pot (https://www.mommypotamus.com/instant-pot-bone-broth-recipe/).

        6. Or, a crock pot (http://thehealthyfoodie.com/slow-cooker-beef-bone-broth/).

        7. Freeze it in mason jars! Here is the safe and shatter-free way to do it: https://abetterwaytothrive.com/freezing-in-glass-no-more-broken-jars/

        8. Freeze it in ice cube trays (and then put the cubes in a container to save freezer space), so it’s easily thawed and rationed in recipes that require less of it.

        9. Use lots of veggies, herbs, and spices to help flavors carry into the finished product. Cooking for long periods of time can diminish flavors.

        10.Can’t get time to make bone broth? Kettle & Fire is a good store bought brand: https://www.kettleandfire.com/where-to-buy-bone-broth

        I FINALLY succeeded at making (beef) bone broth using this simple recipe from WellnessMama’s blog (https://wellnessmama.com/5888/bone-broth/). At last, I had several quarts at my disposal! Good thing it keeps well in the freezer! But, the question remains: how do I use this stuff? Some useful things I’ve tried and intend to try are:

        1. Using it in soup, obviously! It’s great as a hearty soup base or even for simple egg drop soup.

        2. Drinking it as a beverage! I really enjoy it with a little lemon juice (and sometimes, ginger) I’ve found this to be very relaxing and soothing for tummy trouble. It’s also great for keeping warm in the dangerously cold North Dakota winters!

        3. Using it in place of (or along with) a fat for sauteing veggies or meats.

        4. As a gravy or added in place of water in many crock pot, stew, or freezer meal recipes.

        Making bone broth doesn’t have to be complicated, even if you’ve got your hands full! My advice to you is this: follow the directions (something I don’t always do!), research and troubleshoot to correct mistakes, DON’T BURN IT, and don’t give up! Happy cooking to all. 🙂

 


Disclaimer: All information on this blog is for informational purposes only. I am not a licensed medical professional. Please discuss any dietary changes, supplements, or medical questions with your doctor.

dianes-profile

Diane Stanislowski is a wife, mother, and researcher with the goal of restoring the practice of traditional holistic approaches to wellness and sharing evidence-based information with the public.

She lives in Grand Forks North Dakota with her husband and daughter Jane, and receives raw milk and pastured meats from Bartlett Farms.

Diane Stanislowski

Author: Diane Stanislowski